Connect with us

Dog Healthcare

Dog food contamination leads to voluntary recall

Published

on

dog food contamination leads to voluntary recall

The deaths of more than 80 dogs have led to the voluntary recall of several Sportmix pet food products.

The deaths of more than 70 dogs have led to the voluntary recall of several Sportmix pet food products.

Midwestern Pet Food Inc., the brand’s parent company, initially pulled some varieties of the Sportmix canine diet in December after 28 dogs died and eight others became sick upon eating the product.

On Jan. 11, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) updated this number, stating it is aware of more than 70 pets that have died and more than 80 pets that are ill.

The agency says Sportmix “may contain potentially fatal levels of aflatoxin,” which is “a toxin produced by the mold Aspergillus flavus, which can grow on corn and other grains used as ingredients in pet food.”

When appearing in high levels, aflatoxin can cause illness and death in animals. According to FDA, symptoms of aflatoxin poisoning in pets includes sluggishness, loss of appetite, vomiting, jaundice, and/or diarrhea. Pets are more susceptible to aflatoxin poisoning because they tend to eat the same food every day, unlike humans, who eat a more varied diet, the agency says.

The Missouri Department of Agriculture (MDA) reportedly tested multiple samples of Sportmix and found high levels of aflatoxin.

The list of Sportmix recalled varieties includes:

  • Sportmix Energy Plus, 50 lb. bag
    • Exp 03/02/22/05/L2
    • Exp 03/02/22/05/L3
    • Exp 03/03/22/05/L2
  • Sportmix Energy Plus, 44 lb. bag
  • Sportmix Premium High Energy, 50 lb. bag
  • Sportmix Premium High Energy, 44 lb. bag
  • Sportmix Original Cat, 31 lb. bag
  • Sportmix Original Cat, 15 lb. bag
    • Exp 03/03/22/05/L2
    • Exp 03/03/22/05/L3

Lot code information may be found on the back of bag and will appear in a three-line code, with the top line in format “EXP 03/03/22/05/L#/B###/HH:MM.”

This story was updated Jan. 12 to reflect the latest data from FDA.

Source * www.veterinarypracticenews.com – * Source link

Advertisement
Advertisement

Tags

Advertisement