Connect with us

Dog Food

Pet Food Safety Priority: 3 Questions to Ask Your Pet Food Manufacturer

Published

on

pet food safety priority: 3 questions to ask your pet

Sponsored content from Alphia

Choosing a pet food manufacturing partner is a complicated process. Assessing a company’s reputation in the marketplace is a good place to start, but why stop? It’s important to pull the curtain back to see what’s going on behind the scenes. This will give you a better idea of ​​how a company rates the quality and safety of their product.

Most reputable pet food manufacturers have a food and safety program in place. How thorough is it, however? How is it implemented? If you don’t answer these key questions, you run the risk of creating a product that doesn’t meet your standards, your customers’ standards, or the requirements of the FDA.

To avoid these risks, here are 3 critical questions you should ask any potential pet food manufacturer:

  1. How is your food safety program structured?

Most food safety programs aim to eliminate, prevent, or reduce food safety hazards to acceptable levels. To achieve this goal, the food safety management system (e.g. HACCP) must be based on effective prerequisites for food safety programs, which should include:

  • Supply chain management program – The integrity of the end product is guaranteed by setting specifications for all ingredients. The manufacturer should only buy from approved suppliers and create a schedule for the necessary supplier verification activities, such as on-site audits.
  • Sanitary transport of food – The food safety of the final products should be ensured by ensuring that the consignor or any other transport group handling the product follows prescribed hygiene practices.
  • cGMPs (Current Manufacturing Practices for Goods) – Any reputable animal feed partner should already be using cGMPs, which includes the use of hairnets to prevent product contamination, adequate water supplies and ongoing plant hygiene.
  • SOPs (Standard Operating Procedures) – The introduction of SOPs ensures the consistent execution of critical tasks.
  • SSOP (Sanitation Standard Operating Procedure) – Step-by-step procedures for disinfecting and cleaning equipment to minimize contamination.
  • Regular audits – External or internal audits should be carried out in the production facility; reports from a certified company should be available on request.
  • Committed culture – Manufacturers should commit to establishing guidelines and training their staff on food safety to ensure that this is one of their guiding principles.
  1. What measures are you taking to prevent cross-contamination?

Cross-contamination is an often overlooked segment of food safety, making it an important question to be asked of any potential partner. Every manufacturing process should already include a “killing step” with the aim of killing pathogens that may be present in the ingredients. Without appropriate precautions, however, harmful microorganisms can be transferred from contaminated surfaces to food surfaces or from raw materials to the end product. One effective preventive measure that you might want to look for is hygienic zoning. This is the case when a facility is divided into separate zones in order to separate areas for handling raw materials from areas after it has been killed, such as e.g. Both movement and airflow should be controlled to prevent cross-contamination between zones.

  1. Has any of your products been recalled? If so, what steps did you take to make sure it never happened again?

It is important to confirm that your prospective manufacturer has a history of meeting both customer and regulatory requirements. If the manufacturer has experienced a recall, before you cross it off your list, ask them what happened and what they did to alleviate the problem and make sure it doesn’t recur.

A recall can be evidence that a food safety program has failed; However, there are many reasons for a recall. For example, it can be as simple as an employee mistake leading to a recall. Or an ingredient from a supplier with a confirmation letter provided that later turned out to be contaminated. Whatever the reason for the recall, smart questions can help shed light on the real causes of the recall and help you determine if the manufacturer’s food safety programs are up to your standards.

Conclusion

Making pet food is a complicated process. In order to avoid contamination and maintain product integrity, suitable measures must be taken at every step from raw material procurement through production to transport. Failure to comply with food safety standards can lead to disruptions to your production schedule or, in the worst case, a recall by the FDA.

Before deciding to partner with a pet food manufacturer, make sure it is adequately reviewed by asking smart, informed questions and doing your own audit. Your reputation and your customers, two and four-legged friends, depend on it.

Source * www.petfoodindustry.com – * Source link

Dog Food

New pet food launches recover, focus on health

Published

on

new pet food launches recover, focus on health

I recently wrote about the post-COVID-19 pet food market could be ripe for innovation, in part because new product development has lagged in 2020 amid all the disruption caused by the pandemic. The delay appeared to be manifested in data from Mintel on new pet food launches, which showed a decrease of about 67% from 2019 to 2020.

The data was presented in a webinar by Max Davis, Business Unit Manager for the filling and closing systems of Waldner North America; I’ve seen the same diagram elsewhere. However, the 2020 data point of 169 pet food launches compared to 510 in 2019 can be misleading; that earlier number likely did not hold for all of 2020.

According to recent Mintel data released by TreeTop, an ingredient supplier, in its report, Pet Food Market Trends July 2021, the segmentation of the data after a 12 month period from June 2020 to May 2021 paints a different picture: In During that period, new pet food launches rebounded to reach 569, an increase of nearly 5% over the previous twelve month period June 2019 to May 2020 from 543 launches – a decrease from the previous twelve month period June 2018 of 562 through May 2019 Market launches, but only by about 3%.

My guess is that the 169 number shown by Davis and others for 2020 was mostly from the beginning of the year through May; Obviously, with the pandemic and lockdowns, new product development lagged and pet food companies focused on making their existing products and shipping them to pets and their owners. Regardless of any discrepancies in numbers or reporting periods, it is encouraging to see that new pet food launches will resume later in 2020 and into the first half of 2021, which supports the idea that pet food was and is indeed ripe for innovation .

Pet owners, new pet foods and treats are the focus of health / wellness

More importantly, the new Mintel data in the TreeTop report (who worked with Michael Sellitto, Associate Editor of the Mintel Global New Products Database) provided a helpful overview of some of the key ingredients in recent pet food launches that pet owners are looking for.

For example, 98 new pet food products had all-natural claims between June 2020 and May 2021, compared to 88 and 89 in the previous two 12-month periods. This may have been a response to the pandemic and how it led consumers to focus on the health and wellbeing of their own and their families, including furry members, as some people see “natural” foods and products for healthier people keep.

Accordingly, in a survey by Mintel / TreeTop in March 2021, health and wellness statements on pet food and treats aroused great interest among US pet owners. A healthy digestion was at the top of the list with 58% of the respondents, closely followed by muscles, joints and bones with 52%, skin / coat health with 49%, support of the immune system with 46% and heart / cardiovascular system with 40% . Other health and wellness claims selected by respondents included weight management, calming / anxiety relief, brain / cognitive support, vision support, and energy boost.

The influence of human food is back at play

As TreeTop supplies fruit ingredients to the pet food market, the report highlighted the leading fruits appearing in new pet foods from June 2018 to May 2021, according to the Mintel database. Lingonberry, blueberry, and apple took the top three spots on the list, far surpassing other fruits such as banana, carob, pomegranate, and others. Interestingly, the use of these top three fruits decreased quite a bit between June 2020 and May 2021.

Perhaps even more interesting, the use of certain flavors in new pet foods and treats has increased significantly since June 2018. Pumpkin / squash rose 500% in the three years from then to May 2021, and a similar flavor, sweet potato / kumara, increased 300%. Bacon / lard / pancetta / bacon & cheese, cheese, and blueberry and peanut butters all rose 200%. Unsurprisingly, these are all flavors and ingredients that have grown in popularity for human foods over the same period. If bacon / lard / pancetta / bacon & cheese isn’t a taste and trend influenced by human nutrition, I don’t know what!

Mintel’s data showed that this flavor accounted for only 1.9% of new pet food and treats launches over the three year period, while peanut butter (alone) accounted for 3.4%. The most popular flavors – no surprise here either – were chicken with 15.1% of new launches and beef with 7.3%. By comparison, another protein source, salmon, accounted for 3.1% of new product launches.

The percentages for protein sources are also pretty much in line with human diets, in my opinion, although the strong likes and needs of dogs and cats for such flavors and ingredients (or at least their owners’ perceptions) have likely also played a strong role in pet food’s taste selection Manufacturers for their new products.

LinkedIn

Facebook

Twitter

Source * www.petfoodindustry.com – * Source link

Continue Reading

Dog Food

US Millennials Adopted Pets at Highest Rate in Pandemic

Published

on

us millennials adopted pets at highest rate in pandemic

Adapted to a press release:

Quotient, a digital media and advertising technology company, released insights into the pet adoption boom last year and its impact on brands and retailers in the year ahead. In a survey of 1,000+ U.S. cat and dog owners aged 18 and over, 33% said they adopted a pet during the pandemic. To get a significant cross-section of the data, Quotient also pulled in internal social and sales data showing how consumer shopping habits for pet products had changed during the pandemic.

The survey shows that of the people who adopted pets during the pandemic, 52% were male and 48% were female. Additionally, the survey found that millennials were the most likely to adopt during the pandemic, with 43% contributing to the fur baby boom. While millennials mostly adopted pets for children / other family members who had wanted one, 32% of Generation Z adopted a pet to improve their mental health.

“With the introduction of furry companions during the pandemic, we saw interesting consumer buying trends for groceries, gifts, treats and more,” said Steven Boal, CEO of Quotient. “These animals have and will influence consumer purchasing behavior long after the pandemic. This gives retailers and brands an opportunity to understand the ongoing needs of their customers – and their pets – and provide them with value. ”

When pandemic restrictions in the US were eased, Quotient asked dog and cat owners which top 3 items they would like to spend the most money on on their pet in the next 12 months. It’s no surprise that food and medication / pet care are going to create the biggest hole in consumer wallets.

Pandemic affected human-pet relationships

The past year has been a time when many consumers stayed home and spent less, but that didn’t necessarily apply to pet owners. Almost a sixth of those surveyed usually feed their dogs and cats with gourmet and / or subscription catering services. Younger generations are even more willing to feed their pets premium strains. This supports Quotient’s internal data, which also showed that pets eat premium. Sales of non-dry dog ​​food – including wet and damp dog foods, which tend to be more expensive – has increased by 25% compared to pre-COVID.

While most pet owners expect necessities like food and health care to dominate their spending, 11% believe clothing and accessories will be the most expensive in the next 12 months. This is not surprising as 78% of respondents consider their pet to be their best friend or family member. Their love and affection lingers through the different seasons of gift giving, with nearly half of those surveyed planning to treat their pooch with a Christmas surprise. Almost as many plan to get a birthday present.

Gotcha Day, a day to celebrate the anniversary of the adoption of a pet, is another major milestone, and respondents celebrating the day plan to spend an average of $ 87 on a gift to mark the occasion.

With the increase in dog and cat adoption during the pandemic, consumer shopping habits will change for the foreseeable future. This gives retailers and CPGs a unique opportunity to identify their customers’ new shopping needs.

Source * www.petfoodindustry.com – * Source link

Continue Reading

Dog Food

Is Pet Obesity Driving Pet Food Growth In Mexico?

Published

on

is pet obesity driving pet food growth in mexico?

Obesity is an emerging and silent enemy that pet owners are typically unfamiliar with, especially in the developing pet food markets. According to a Triplethree International study of animal diseases in Mexico, in 2020 only 10% of dog owners said their dogs were overweight or obese.

However, actual obesity rates are likely to be higher than reported. According to Royal Canin’s Mexican Market website, at least 20% of dogs in developed markets are obese. This metric rules out the percentage of obese dogs that are even more difficult to measure and observe, especially in small and medium-sized breeds.

Surprisingly, the local veterinary community is not disclosing any information, data, or knowledge about the level of obesity in the Mexican pet population.

Relationship Between Pet Obesity and Pet Food Market Growth?

It’s not hard to see that pet obesity, in most cases, is due to excessive caloric intake for the pet’s energy needs. At the same time, it is important to understand the combination of factors that are driving growth in the pet food market. On the demand side, these factors are pet population, calorie penetration, and overfeeding.

As calorie penetration and pet populations increase in most Latin American markets, the industry may be ignoring the overfeeding effect.

Pet owners ignore the manufacturer’s feeding guidelines

Pet owners likely feed their pets according to the pet’s appetite rather than the manufacturer’s guidelines on pet food packaging labels. This often leads to overfeeding.

Triplethree International estimates that overfeeding of pet food accounts for between 1% and 1.5% of total pet food consumption in Mexico. That estimate is simply what is left of the growth rate after subtracting population growth and the increase in calorie penetration. In other words, if the market sold 1 million tons in a year, about 10 to 15 thousand tons of pet food would be due to overfeeding.

Overweight and obesity in Mexican dogs and cats may not be entirely critical today, but this problem could ultimately add to the cost of medical treatments, which could hinder or reshape the future development of Mexico’s pet food industry.

Iván Franco is the founder of Triplethree International and has contributed to hundreds of research projects for various consumer goods industries. He was named Global Consultant of the Year by Euromonitor International and is the author of the book 17 Market Strategies for Growth (in Spanish).

Source * www.petfoodindustry.com – * Source link

Continue Reading

Trending