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The Kennel Club fears that the Otterhound, Dandie Dinmont Terrier and Skye Terrier dog breeds are threatened with extinction

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There are fears that the Otterhound, Dandie Dinmont Terrier and Skye Terrier are critically endangered after only 121 pups were born last year.

Puppies like Labradors and French Bulldogs saw record sales during the Covid lockdown, but the same cannot be said of the Otterhound, one of Britain’s oldest dog breeds dating back to the 12th century.

The scent dog only took in seven puppies in 2020. He’s been on the Kennel Club’s Most Endangered Species list for years, but this is the first time in a year that he has posted a single-digit number for newborn puppies.

Otterhounds are now rarer than giant pandas, of which there are around 2,000 worldwide, and a number of other purebred breeds are also a cause for concern.

These include the Skye Terrier, of which only 27 puppies were registered in 2020, and the Dandie Dinmont Terrier, which added 87 newcomers.

Experts say these dogs have become a forgotten species and are rarely seen, while the demand for popular mixed breeds such as cavapoos and cockerpoos has skyrocketed to as much as £ 5,000.

There are fears that the Otterhound, Dandie Dinmont Terrier (litter pictured) and Skye Terrier are threatened with extinction after only 121 pups were born last year

The scent dog has been on the Kennel Club's Most Endangered Species list for years, but this is the first time in a year that it has recorded a single-digit number for newborn pups (Otterhound pups pictured in 2012).

The scent dog has been on the Kennel Club’s Most Endangered Species list for years, but this is the first time in a year that it has recorded a single-digit number for newborn pups (Otterhound pups pictured in 2012).

In 2020, only 27 Skye Terrier puppies were registered. Bill Lambert, Kennel Club Health and Welfare Director, said:

In 2020, only 27 Skye Terrier puppies were registered. Bill Lambert, Director of Health and Welfare at the Kennel Club, said, “We monitor these breeds and once they drop below 450 registered puppies per year we put them on the watchlist.”

Rare Heritage breed puppies cost a fraction of that, but are still ignored as no one knows anything about them.

The three breeds can trace their deaths back to 1978 when otter hunting, which became a common pastime in the Middle Ages because it was considered a pest, was banned.

In total, there are fewer than 1,000 otterhounds worldwide, with around 300 of them in the UK.

This compares with nearly 80,000 Labrador and French Bulldog puppies registered in 2020.

Former Crufts winner Maria Lerego said she could, on one hand, count the number of Otterhound breeders left, including herself.

Ms. Lerego of Ledbury, Herefordshire said: “I think the breed is seriously endangered and has a bleak future. Very grim.

“They never really became popular or sparked the imagination, and because they’re not glamorous people, they don’t want them.

‘Still, they make excellent pets. They are very sociable, intelligent and have very easy-going characters. ‘

A number of other purebred breeds that are also of concern are cause for concern, including the Dandie Dinmont Terrier (puppy pictured) which registered 87 new arrivals in 2020

A number of other purebred breeds that are also of concern are cause for concern, including the Dandie Dinmont Terrier (puppy pictured) which registered 87 new arrivals in 2020

New Forest breeder Madeleine Fear recently bred four Dandie Dinmont puppies, each of which has a home. Pictured: one of the rare puppies with his grandfather Basil

New Forest breeder Madeleine Fear recently bred four Dandie Dinmont puppies, each of which has a home. Pictured: one of the rare puppies with his grandfather Basil

A new batch of Dandie Dinmont Terrier puppies. Only 87 were born last year, compared to nearly 80,000 Labrador and French Bulldog puppies registered in 2020

A new batch of Dandie Dinmont Terrier puppies. Only 87 were born last year, compared to nearly 80,000 Labrador and French Bulldog puppies registered in 2020

A Dandie Dinmont Terrier puppy, pictured above. Ms. Fear said: It's amazing how many people don't know these dogs exist. '

A Dandie Dinmont Terrier puppy, pictured above. Ms. Fear said: It’s amazing how many people don’t know these dogs exist. ‘

Rare Dandie Dinmont Terrier puppies with their mother Polly. The current trend for dogs like the French bulldog and the cavapoo has resulted in puppy prices rising as high as £ 5,000

Rare Dandie Dinmont Terrier puppies with their mother Polly. The current trend for dogs like the French bulldog and the cavapoo has resulted in puppy prices rising as high as £ 5,000

Four Dandie Dinmont Terrier puppies. The breeder said: “All the time people ask me what breed it is because they have never seen one and they ask

Four Dandie Dinmont Terrier puppies. The breeder said, “All the time people ask me what breed it is because they have never seen one and they ask,” What is it crossed with? “

The Otterhound: One of Britain’s oldest dog breeds dating back to the 12th century

The Otterhound is one of the oldest dog breeds in Great Britain and dates back to the 12th century.

While it is likely that the breed was derived from Bloodhounds, it is believed that they are also related to French Griffons due to the pronounced ear folds.

There are fewer than 1,000 of them in the world and around 300 of them in the UK.

The breed can trace its death back to 1978 when otters were banned from hunting, but some breeders have helped protect the dog Future through the use of pack dogs.

Otter hunting began in the Middle Ages because there were so many small mammals that they were considered a pest. However, over time, hunting became a kind of sport.

An oily coat, webbed feet, sophisticated nostrils, and odor make the breed ideal for its original purpose.

Otterhounds have a lifespan of over 10 years and are classified as large dogs that require more than two hours of exercise per day and are groomed at least once a week.

Source: Kennel Club and DogTime

The current trend for dogs like the French bulldog and the cavapoo has resulted in puppy prices rising as high as £ 5,000.

Bill Lambert, Kennel Club Health and Welfare Director, said, “Some traditional breeds become less popular just because people don’t see them and forget about them.

“We’re trying to raise awareness to make sure people know about them.

“We know there is a trend towards smaller dogs these days, but there are many small breeds like many old English terrier breeds that are good companions and that popularity has started.

‘We monitor these breeds and once they drop below 450 registered breeds per year we put them on the watchlist.

“As soon as they are below 300, we start saying,” We have to do something about it as they are being endangered. “

‘For example, the Cairn Terrier has fallen from 1,300 in 2011 to around 440, and that gives us cause for concern. They are a great little breed and suitable for a lot of people, but they are just forgotten.

“There are certain breeds like the French Bulldog that have seen tremendous growth and have stolen some of the market from some terriers.”

New Forest breeder Madeleine Fear recently bred four Dandie Dinmont puppies, each of which has a home.

She said, “It’s amazing how many people don’t know these dogs exist.

“All the while people ask me what breed it is because they have never seen one and they ask,” What is it crossed with? “

“People paid £ 4,000 or £ 5,000 for popular intersections because they look at what their neighbors have. You buy what the dog looks like and have no idea what’s underneath.

Former Crufts winner Maria Lerego (pictured above, with a full-size Otterhound) said she could, on the one hand, count the number of Otterhound breeders left, including herself

Former Crufts winner Maria Lerego (pictured above, with a full-size Otterhound) said she could, on the one hand, count the number of Otterhound breeders left, including herself

Rare Heritage breed puppies cost a fraction of it but are still ignored as no one knows about it (file photo of an adult Otterhound).

Rare Heritage breed puppies cost a fraction of it but are still ignored as no one knows about it (file photo of an adult Otterhound).

“We’re going to lose these traditional races.”

Mr Lambert said social media was partly to blame for influencers driving trends by posting photos of themselves with their pets.

He said: “Years ago, in the 1950s and 1960s, the Welsh corgi became very popular because the queen was photographed with them very often.

“Nowadays we have different influences. Social media plays a huge role and we really attribute the rise of the French bulldog to social media.

“People are influenced by what they see and want to emulate their favorite celebrity and want to buy a dog from it, which is not always the best reason to get a dog.”

Mr Lambert said Otterhounds should be viewed as an alternative to Labradors when people are thinking about which dog to get.

He said, “There is a concern that the otterhound may become extinct. We no longer hunt otters and so they are now bred as companion dogs. They are a large breed and therefore have limited appeal.

“But for the right environment, they make great dogs. People who might be thinking of choosing a Labrador because they are simply more popular, when an Otterhound is actually a better fit with their lifestyle. ‘

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